Effective States and Inclusive Development

Can politics help explain persistently low education quality in Rwanda?

3 April 2019 Tim Williams Based on Dr William’s research published in World Development, this post was originally featured as a guest blog for The Rise Programme.   Over the last two decades, the Rwandan government has received global recognition for its impressive efforts

Bangladesh is booming, but slide towards authoritarianism could burst the bubble

25 March 2019   M Niaz Asadullah & Antonio Savoia This post was first published in The Conversation     Bangladesh has been a development success story in recent years. The country made remarkable progress in poverty alleviation prior to the Millennium Development G

Prof Sam Hickey on The UN Global Dispatches Podcast – How countries can avoid the resource curse

 12 February 2018 Our Research Director, Professor Sam Hickey, is this week featured on The UN Global Dispatches Podcast. He talks about groundbreaking ESID research on how governments might avoid the resource curse – the negative consequences that befall a country when it disc

What are the limitations of working with the grain?

  17/1/19 Brian Levy     This post was first published on Brian’s blog Working with the Grain When does a call to ‘work with the grain’  violate foundational ethical commitments? Governance reversals globally have given new urgency to this question; it has recentl

Global development post-2015: some reflections on convergence and what facilitates it

   Antonio Savoia and David Hulme explore what we know and what we should ask next about developmental convergence.     Research on global development progress during the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) period has been tracking the shift in global wealth occurring with t

WATCH – Benjamin Chemouni on pockets of effectiveness in Rwanda

7 August 2018 Watch our ESID researcher in Rwanda, Dr Benjamin Chemouni, on his new research into pockets of effectiveness

Viewing the territorial reach of the Ethiopian state through the lens of social protection

    14 May 2018 Tom Lavers   A drive of little more than an hour from the eastern edge of Tigray into Afar serves to illustrate some of the many extremes of Ethiopia: a drop in altitude of more than 1,000m; an increase in temperature from the moderate (albeit far from M

Navigating the labyrinths of the ‘deals’ world

30 April 2018 Mirza Hassan and Selim Raihan What’s responsible for the high and stable growth rate in Bangladesh?    For many economists, Bangladesh case is a paradox since such steady and reasonably high growth took place in the context of ‘bad’ or ‘weak&

Not an ordinary speech: A reflection on the first speech of the new Prime Minster of Ethiopia

  23 April 2018 Amdissa Teshome An independent consultant and social science researcher, Amdissa Teshome reports from Addis Ababa with a fascinating insight into the inaugural speech of Ethiopia’s new Prime Minister.   Background to the speech For the past four years i

On Labour Mobility, Economic Growth and Targeted Programmes

    29 March 2018 Lant Pritchett   For at least a couple of decades NGOs and others in developing countries have been designing, evaluating, tinkering, and trying to improve projects and programs that deliver specific in-kind “interventions” (e.g., micro-credit, asset t