Effective States and Inclusive Development

Access to independent media as a development goal: can we measure it?

27 May 2014 By Antonio Savoia. This was the key question that emerged at the World Press Freedom Day 2014 conference held on 5-6 May in Paris at the UNESCO headquarters.  Not the usual academic folk I am used to mingling with, but the theme was so interesting that even an economist wo

Political settlements in post-conflict states: David Craig’s lessons from Cambodia and the Pacific

23 May 2014 By Kate Pruce. Current donor approaches to ‘successful transition’ in post-conflict states focus on institutional reforms, with the aim of creating an underlying settlement leading to strengthened security and democracy. However, this narrative simplicity disappears in any

‘Transformational politics’ in India? Whatever happened to social justice?

15 May 2014. By Indrajit Roy. Political pundits have described the just-concluded elections in India as ‘transformational’. However, none of the issues highlighted by the national media, the intelligentsia and the ‘mainstream’ political parties – development, secularism, corrupt

Malawi elections: more economic discussion needed

Malawi goes to the polls on 20 May. We spoke to ESID researcher and economist Jonathan Said to get a sense of the issues ahead of the election. Said has been working in Malawi as an economist for three years. Malawi has recently been rocked by what’s termed “cashgate” – the biggest fi

What have academics to offer to the challenge of equity, justice and inclusion?

13 May 2014. By Diana Mitlin. After three-and-a-half days of sitting in central Cape Town, what have I learnt about a core underpinning assumption of ESID, i.e. that academics can contribute to inclusive development? It is relatively easy to understand what academics have to offer to

“It’s the economy, stupid”: How the poor economic performance of the UPA regime is a key issue in the Indian elections

8 May 2014. By Kunal Sen. (Originally posted on the Ballots & Bullets blog.) Along with corruption, a stagnant economy and high inflation dominate the concerns of voters in the current general election in India. Like voters elsewhere, Indian voters seem likely to vote the incumben

Politics in the trenches of development: Mainstreaming political economy analysis in aid agencies

7 May 2014. By Pablo Yanguas. “Politics matters for development”. From project officers all the way up to the heads of multilateral development agencies, from lowest-rung civil servants to cabinet ministers, everyone who has ever worked trying to enact social, economic or

Cape Town post-mortem: 6 things I learned about ESID

6 May 2014. By Pablo Yanguas. I have been working as part of ESID for a little over 15 months now, but last week was the first time that I actually saw the faces of many of our partners and realised their passion for what they do. The Cape Town workshop was a whirlwind tour of the lat

Cape Town Live Blog: Day Four – Poverty’s voice

1 May 2014 One of the best ways to understand the complex power structures that stand in the way of people moving out of poverty is to walk streets where people live and talk to them about their living conditions. So the ESID Cape Town conference attendees were fortunate to be given t

Cape Town Live Blog: Day Three – What have we learned?

30 April 2014. By Rowena Harding. 35 researchers, some policy makers and media, three days, and at least eight hours of meetings a day. What have we learned? In true research style, we could provide a working paper of evidence on our learnings from the conference, but to embrace our n